Dear Paris,

I am so truly sorry.

We will all unite for you, whoever we are, we will support you and be there for whatever you need.

Screen shot 2015-11-15 at 11.53.15

Paris is just one city, we must remember that there are people all over the world being caused pain by these atrocious acts on a daily basis. I encourage you as a citizen of this wonderful, amazing, vibrant world to look deeper. To look beyond the face of the media, the Western portrayals that the media wants you to see, to look further into what is happening in countries all over the world including Africa and the Middle East.

Facebook has asked us to change our profile photos temporarily to a French flag and whilst I truly feel devastated for these particular attacks, I want to keep my profile photo filled with colour. Filled with every colour of every flag to represent every country that has ever been inflicted with pain from these utterly pointless attacks on our human race.

Our Paris, you are beautiful. Our World, you are beautiful.

Please stop destroying our beautiful world.

It’s time to stop now.

Becky at Pretty & Petit

Advertisements

A Dream to Dance

When I was at secondary school, I absolutely loved to dance. It was one of the first extra curricular activities I joined, alongside studying music, it was my passion.

Screen shot 2015-11-11 at 21.12.59

Along with my friends at school, we attended early morning dance classes and practiced through our lunchtimes for annual dance performances and took part in once in a lifetime opportunities. Part of this was encouraged by our wonderful dance teacher, a woman so passionate about her dancing that it was inspirational and motivational to watch her perform – it made us want to have that same passion and she was why I think we were all so committed to attending those classes.

Along with school classes, I also attended a theatre school every Saturday called Theatre Train. I had trouble with my confidence so not only did this assist with this issue through drama, but we also enjoyed an hour of singing and an hour of dance. In 2006 I had the opportunity to perform at the Royal Albert Hall as part of a celebration called ‘Songs of the Century’, an incredible experience and certainly a once in a lifetime opportunity! To find your local Theatre Train group make sure you check out their website by clicking here.

RAH1

It wasn’t until my third year of University that I started to notice pain in my feet. There were days that I would struggle to walk to the main University building, less than a mile from where we lived. I took tablets to cope with the pain, but it got to the point where I just could not cope anymore. I visited my GP, who suggested I keep an eye on it and if the pain worsened to return but ultimately that I may need surgery. It was at this time that I started to use a splint on my big toe of my right foot, which I realise now has hindered my progress and caused more damage than good. Throughout this time, as I had been diagnosed with bunions I researched further into what they are. I always thought they were some sort of gross fungal infection!! Never realising they are actually to do with the main bones of your foot. As shown by the diagram below it is basically to do with the joint where your big toe joins the main part of your foot. Sometimes, due to bad footwear or other genetic problems, the joint ends up jutting out at an angle. This often is pain free and many go throughout their lifetime without experiencing any pain at all on the joint. In some cases however, it can cause significant pain similar to the feeling of arthritis where the joint becomes stiff and achy. This was how my feet ended up.

Screen shot 2015-11-11 at 21.03.21

In Summer 2012, I noticed the pain at this point was getting excruciating so headed back to the doctor. He put me on a course of Ibruprofen to ease the pain and referred me to my local hospital for xrays. I saw a surgeon who said they would need to operate and insert metalwork to straighten out the bones in my right foot. In November 2012, 3 years ago, I had my first (and what I thought at the time, my only) operation on my right foot. It was a day surgery which meant I could arrive in the morning, have the operation and be sent home the same day. It was a quick procedure performed under general anaesethic and I was on my way home by 5pm that day. As it was a simple procedure the healing time was fairly quick and 6 weeks later I was back at work.

Over the next year or so and despite the surgery, the pain lingered and on some days it was even worse than before. I went to my new GP based in London who referred me back to hospital. In March 2014 I had my appointment at Charing Cross Hospital, London. Whilst initially I had been referred for my left foot the surgeon took a look at my right foot and ultimately told me that it needed to redone as the initial procedure had not worked. They carried out some X rays and had found that the main bone of my foot was actually splitting due to the pressure of the bunion. It was at this time that they gave me crutches and I spent that March through to December 2014 using them. In July 2014 I had my operation and spent the summer recovering. It took a long time to heal. I had a cast on my leg and was in a wheelchair for 6 weeks. I promised myself I would never take walking for granted after experiencing this.

10580052_10152624419127733_3124860768176669090_n

I am currently awaiting hospital treatment to begin on my left foot which will again involve surgery and two months waiting for it to heal but this time I feel ready. I feel like I know what to expect now and I do feel some comfort in that. I do feel pain every day. It’s uncomfortable and frustrating but something I have learned to live with. Some days are better than others and I notice it is at its worse when it is cold and raining outside (which I can often tell before even opening the curtains some days!)

Screen shot 2015-11-11 at 21.46.35

As for my dancing? I would absolutely love to be able to dance again. Contemporary dance was my absolute favourite and I am starting to slowly work on my core strength to be able to attempt to dance in this way again one day. I definitely still dream of it. I have got to the point where I am visiting the gym on a weekly basis with the hope to join a dance class once my feet feel strong enough. Fingers (and toes!) crossed!

Screen shot 2015-11-11 at 21.13.07

This post has been submitted as an entry into the Dancewear Central competition. Dancewear Central is the UK’s number 1 dancewear specialist and provides a fantastic range of dancewear for all ages! There are lots of amazing deals on the site, perfect for dancers including up to 50% off 1000s of products on the site and free delivery on orders over £60! Make sure you check it out by clicking here.

Becky at Pretty & Petit

#LoveMe Challenge – Day 19

Prompts

Something You feel strongly about

images

I seriously dislike the word ‘hate’. I don’t feel like I ‘hate’ anything. There are things that make me feel uncomfortable and there are things that I dislike – certain tastes or smells for example, but I would never say that I ‘hate’ them. I also feel extremely uncomfortable when people talk about their hatred for other people. How can anyone justify their hatred of someone? Usually a feeling of ‘hatred’ stems historically or through a feeling of peer pressure, through isolated groups attacking one other. When asking someone why they feel the anger that they do I would bet 9 times out of 10 at least that they would not be able to reasonably justify their answer.

Hate is such a negative word. How can anyone be happy when they use it? How can anyone think positively and work towards a brighter future and better relationships when using it? I found an interesting definition of the word which interpreted the word as stemming from fear, anger or sense of injury. At least two of those words are associated with the person using the word feeling threatened by those they are targeting. I wonder if the same can be said for current situations in the world, whether action is being taken through fear or the sense of being threatened with injury or even death. It’s a thought worth considering. It could also be interpreted as a sign of weakness, and therefore that hatred can be stemmed through a feeling of weakness. The third word, anger, is often incorrectly associated with hatred but in fact these are two very different feelings and emotions. It can be argued however, that extreme anger is a form of hatred as severe action is carried out at this point.

In psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud defined hate as an ego state that wishes to destroy the source of its unhappiness. Although many psychologists believe hatred to be a form of attitude rather than a temporary emotional state.

IMG_5316-copy-3

How do you feel about the word ‘hate’? Is there anything you feel strongly about?

Becky at Pretty & Petit